Training Classification

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The Training Classification is the informal name used for a legal ruling on what Pokémon can Trainers legally capture, retain and train, as used by at least the Kanjoh and Angela regions as of 5 years ago. It deals with the degree of danger to the Trainer and to third parties that a Pokémon can deal.

Public Classifications

Class A

Pokémon in this class are considered as being of sufficiently low safety concern to merit recommended "Starter Pokémon" or "first catch" status. Class A Pokémon (and ONLY Class A Pokémon) may also be allowed to travel in the company of an unlicensed trainer supervised by a license carrier.

It should be noted that many Class A group mons have evolved forms that are classified outside of this group. Accordingly, such forms are illegal to be left in the tutelage of an unlicensed trainer.

Example species of Class A Pokémon: Buizel, Eevee, Pikachu.

Notable Subclassifications

  • A15: Base morph Pokémon distributed through accredited "Starter" program. Example individuals under this category in the RP include: Revol.


Class B

Pokémon in this class are considered as being within the normal capabilities to care for of most Trainers exhibiting basic competency of training standards and Pokémon handling. Creatures from this classification are not "harmless" from a safety standpoint, and can still present a significant personal health risk under some circumstances.

Some Class B Pokémon have later morphs that are subject to Class C restrictions, which should be kept in mind by any would-be trainers.

Example species of Class B Pokémon: Dratini, Gloom, Castform; wild counterparts of species under A15 classification.

Notable Subclassifications

  • B15: Intermediate morph Pokémon distributed through accredited "Starter" program.
    Example individuals include: Anguis (As a Servine).
  • B16: Final morph Pokémon distributed through accredited "Starter" program.
    Example individuals include: Muddy.

Class C

Pokémon under Class C classification are recognized as being theoretically safe to feasibly care for in human settings, but are known to be generally beyond the means of most trainers to do so in practice. Any trainer of a Class C Pokemon must be licensed and must demonstrate an ability to control and safely socialize such creatures with other trainers and their Pokémon.

Some subclassifications in this group have more extensive regulations regarding trading and legal release of such creatures.

Example species of Class C Pokémon: Scyther, Aggron; wild counterparts of Pokémon under B16 classification.

Notable Subclassifications

  • C15: Superapex predator Pokémon raised in captivity or evolved from a captured earlier morph; creatures colloquially referred to as 'pseudolegendaries'.
    Example individuals under this category: Draca, Amorpha.
  • C16: Probationary classification for Pokémon having record of physical injury of trainers. This classification is generally easy to appeal, and most trainers will train a Pokémon that winds up attaining this classification at some point.
    Example individuals under this category: ????.
  • C17: Probationary classification for Pokémon having record of involvement in misdemeanor-level criminal activities under current or prior trainer.
    Example individuals under this category: ????.


Restricted Classifications

Pokémon under these Classifications are deemed beyond the ability to safely or otherwise legally accommodate in a regular training environment, and are subjected to restrictions regarding training.

Class D

Pokémon under Class D classification are recognized as being theoretically capable of functioning in broader society under a trainer, but have demonstrated documented behaviour that poses significant hazards to public safety.

On top of all Class C restrictions, Pokémon trained from this classification are deemed beyond the normal abilities to accommodate for purposes of release into the wild or trading to and from other trainers, and requires approval from appropriate jurisdictions to do so legally.

Example Class D Pokemon: Volcarona, most wild counterparts of Class C15 Pokemon.

Notable Subclassifications

  • D3: Classification used for "Fossil" Pokémon.
  • D6: Probationary classification for Pokémon having record of aggravated or severe physical injury of trainers. This classification is typically difficult to appeal, and successful appealing typically result in prolonged C16 status.
    Example individuals under this category: ????.
  • D7: Probationary classification for Pokemon having record of involvement in felony-level criminal activities under current or prior trainer. Most appeals to lift this status from a Pokemon generally fail.
    Example individuals under this classification: Obitus.

Class Z

Pokémon under this classification are ILLEGAL to keep in captivity, either for reasons of fundamentally irreconcilable safety hazards, or for purposes related to the health and stability of wild populations.

Any Pokémon under this classification MUST be specifically cleared for ANY prolonged interaction under a trainer by an appropriate jurisdiction.

Example Class Z Pokémon:

  • "Cryptid Pokémon" often referred to as 'Legendaries' often have ceremonial Z Classifications – not that most trainers who attempted to capture such an entity would live to tell the tale anyway.
  • Delta Pokémon.
  • Shadow Pokémon.

(These classifications are anti-poaching and public-safety measures, and waivers are probably fairly common; any PC mons should not be assumed to fall under here unless plot-relevant.)

Notable Subclassifications

  • Z0: Waiver status allowing for temporary and highly monitored training of a creature from this classification.
    Example individuals under this category: ????.
  • Z1: Wild Pokémon populations that are endangered or protected, and thus ineligible for capture. Not applicable if hatched-in-captivity.
    Example species under this category: Delta Pokémon if poached from Holon.
  • Z3: Pokémon that have been deemed incapable of safely being trained or otherwise released into the wild. Includes Pokémon occasionally referred to as under "manslayer" status.
    Example individuals under this category: Shadow Pokémon.